Posts tagged hiring
October Recap
 
China Partnership Website Refresh

China Partnership Website Refresh

China Partnership

Repeat clients are the best. We first worked with China Partnership the refresh of their brand identity design 2014. It was fun to re-engage and see that our work is still serving them well. With the upcoming release of their first book, they asked us to design promotional materials including a trade show booth, collateral pieces, and website refresh. China Partnership's new book is about their work with the house church movement in Chinese cities. China can be a challenging place for people of a Christian faith tradition, so we’re happy to play a part in the promotion their work.

 
 
West Price Hill Flag Option 3

West Price Hill Flag Option 3

Cincy Flags

This month, the Cincy Flags design team started to present their designs to neighborhood councils around the city for feedback. Chris Glass and I (D.J.) worked on seven neighborhood flags; Lower Price Hill, East Price Hill, West Price Hill, South Fairmount, Riverside, Sedamsville, and Sayler Park. Visit cincyflags.com to have a look and vote for your favorites. The top flag for each neighborhood will be selected and presented later this year or early next. All of the designs will be open source and available entirely free to use by the community. It’s exciting to think of the flags hanging from peoples porches or a recreation center flag pool. 

 
 
Kindness Club Logo

Kindness Club Logo

Kindness Club

Back in May (2018), we worked on the brand identity design for School Board School with Elisa Hoffman during a People's Liberty launch day. Elisa’s daughter liked the School Board School design so much that she asked her mom if Trischler Design Co. design would create a logo for her Kindness Club at Kilgour Elementary. Of course, we said yes. The design process began with a meeting with Lily Hope to learn about her club. It’s quite moving to hear an elementary school student speak about spreading kindness. Together, we decided the logo should be playful, optimistic and welcoming. Lily Hope shared some logos and typefaces she had gathered as inspiration. We collected Lily Hope’s thoughts and came up with the solution pictured above. The decision was made on a typographic solution so that it could be easily shared. Lily Hope has ambitions of the club spreading to other schools in Cincinnati and beyond. The type is bold, unique, and fun. The goal is the brand to stand out in the hallways of an elementary drawing much deserved attention to Lily Hope’s wonderful group. We're designing a second logo for Lily Hope. It will be for her G.I.R.L.S. Book Club. Stay tuned for more in December (2018).  

 
 
Tell are you friends!

Tell are you friends!

We’re Contracting…

We’re exploring what it would look like to contract a young graphic designer for two half-days a week (8-10 hours total). Hopefully, the need would increase, but we’re starting with baby steps. Ideally, the person would have typographic skills, a handle on the creative suite, and some experience with Squarespace. If you’re interested, click the button below.

 
September Recap
 
Branch (Restaurant) & Night Drop (Basement Bar) Logos.

Branch (Restaurant) & Night Drop (Basement Bar) Logos.

Branch & Night Drop

Over the last several months I’ve been working with The Littlefield Group on the brand identity design of their latest venture, Branch & Night Drop. Branch is a beautiful, naturally lit, restaurant and Night Drop is the dark, basement level, bar below it. They're housed within the old bank building (formerly Central Trust) in Cincinnati’s historic East Walnut Hills neighborhood (next to O-Pi-O). Branch & Night Drop will serve up unexpected combinations of food, drinks, and art. Their doors are scheduled for this winter (2018). Sign up to be the first to know when at their site. And, also be sure to check out the window mural by Jon Flannery and Julia Lapowski of owls on a branch next time you drive/walk by the bank.

 
 
Examples of Assignment One - User-Centered Design.

Examples of Assignment One - User-Centered Design.

User-Centered Designer

As the first assignment for my User-Centered Design class, I had the students write about a professional designer who practices User-Centered Design in some shape or fashion. As a requirement, the students had to interview the professional designer or a person who has used or experienced the output of their work. I most enjoyed reading their takeaways from the assignment. Often, students shared how it was valuable to see how practicing professionals actually utilize the methods and tools learned in class. I pulled some of my favorite essays and used them in a lecture on modern day UCD practitioners. I’d notice a big smile in the crowd each time a student realized that the person I was presenting was the person they wrote about. Teaching continues to bring me joy, especially in the little moments like that.

 
 
Want to be a good design? Read.

Want to be a good design? Read.

What are we reading?

I’ve been reading the Man The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat by Oliver Sacks and The Gift by Lewis Hyde. Both at a snails pace. The Man Who Mistook HIs Wife For A Hat is an entertaining, highly readable, look into what it might be like to lose different physical and sensory abilities. The Gift is an anthropological deep dive into gift giving and receiving. The book’s written specifically for creative people who make things and share them with the world (like designers). As someone who hopes to become more generous and less scarcity driven, it’s been enlightening and encouraging. 

Here’s a quote from each book: 

"What is more important for us, at an elemental level, than the control, the owning and operation, of our own physical selves? And yet it is so automatic, so familiar, we never give it a thought.” - Oliver Sacks

“Any exchange, be it of ideas of goats, will tend toward gift if it is intended to recognize, establish, and maintain community.” - Lewis Hyde

 
 
Tell are you friends!

Tell are you friends!

We’re Contracting…

We’re exploring what it would look like to contract a young graphic designer for two half-days a week (8-10 hours total). Hopefully, the need would increase, but we’re starting with baby steps. Ideally, the person would have typographic skills, a handle on the creative suite, and some experience with Squarespace. If you’re interested, click the button below.