Posts in Advice For Design Students
TDC Code of Ethics v1.0

How can I ask my students to do something (write a code of ethics) that I hadn't done myself? That question led me to my first take on a code of ethics that is written below. I decided to keep my set simple. It's three points. They're each inspired by Jesus' temptations by the Devil in the desert. Before you discount that source, think about it. It doesn't matter whether or not you believe in the carpenter.

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Takeaways from The 2019 DB|BD Conference

Ethics. That was the resounding theme of The Design of Business | The Business of Design conference at MIT this past weekend. It was also what attracted me to the event (beyond rubbing shoulders with my favorite living creatives).

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Three Things I Didn’t Learn in Design School

This month, Katie Parker, a fellow DAAP professor, asked me to share with her Professional Practices class what it's like running an independent design business. I took the opportunity to share the practical, non-sexy, advice I wish someone gave me before I started my business.

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Advice to Design Students II: Design With Your Whole Body

As a teacher, I am grateful to play a role in preparing design students to tackle problems differently, today and in the future. I'm noticing that the biggest hindrance to that kind of creativity is an inability to design with the whole body: the head, the heart, and the gut. I know this well because I'm not so good at it either. Here's my basic understanding of each of the parts and what it means to design from each.

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Mid-Semester Lessons from Capstone

It’s the end of February, and we’re about at the half-way point through the spring semester. I’ve been teaching the Senior Capstone course at DAAP. The primary purpose of Capstone is for the students to exhibit the skills they’ve acquired during the last four years at DAAP. In that way, “teacher” isn’t quite the right description for my role because the end goal isn’t to learn from me. My job is to help the students express their knowledge and to encourage them through the most extended project they’ve worked on to date. It’s a lot more like the role of a coach. 

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